3 comments on “Limerick #135

  1. What a marathon piece David! Fine work indeed. There are some great rhymes included, and I was pleased to see the word ‘Reynard’ in there, one of my favourite fox appellations.
    Best wishes as always, Pete.

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    • Pete, most of the names in this limerick were inspired by names from “Hard Times,” or else derived from the name of the book’s author, Charles Dickens.

      Dickens = (Charles) Dickens
      Chucky = Charles (Dickens)
      Huff = (Charles John) Huffam (Dickens)
      Cecilia / Sissy = Cecilia / Sissy (Jupe)
      Bitzer = Bitzer
      Anna = Anna (Massey)
      Bounder = (Josiah & Louisa) Bounderby
      Koch (Kennels) = Coketown
      (St.) Grindel Grad (School…) = (Thomas & Louisa) Gradgrind
      (Dr.) Sleary = (Mr.) Sleary
      Juppé = (Cecilia/Sissy) Jupe
      Beecher = (Harriet) Beecher (Stowe) *

      * The books of Charles Dickens were often compared to those of Harriet Beecher Stowe, whose most famous work is “Uncle Tom’s Cabin.” Apparently, Dickens and Stowe had a “fraught relationship.”

      In this limerick, all of the characters have a defined social role to play. As for the animals, they are particularly symbolic. The chickens are symbolic of prosperity, the fox is symbolic of hard times, and the foxhound is symbolic of hope (more specifically, the “light” that hope hangs on the farm’s “weak limb”). As for the use of Switzerland, the foxhound is a breed believed to have been developed from the Saint Hubert Hound, itself first developed in the Ardennes Abbey in Switzerland, and introduced into the UK by way of the Norman invasion.

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      • As for Baffing, this is a reference to the strike or blow of a club (“baff”). Dr. Sleary moved there after suffering a moral blow due to his involvement in the foxhound affair.

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